Legends of Hockey -- NHL Player Search -- Player -- Cam Russell
As a junior blueliner with the Hull Olympiques of the QMJHL, big Cam Russell threw his weight around well, clearing creases, keeping opponents honest and showing a modest spark of offensive skill.

He was selected 50th overall in the 1987 Entry Draft by the Chicago Blackhawks. Upon completion of his four-year tour of junior duty in Hull, Russell jumped into the Hawks' stream with the Indianapolis Ice of the IHL. The move sparked the beginning of a three-year shuttle tour between Chicago and Indianapolis. It wasn't until the start of the 1992-93 season that the big rearguard finally caught on as a regular in the Windy City.

From then on, Russell established himself as a tough blueliner who concentrated on clearing his own zone and duking it out with uncooperative combatants. The price he paid for his physical play was to suffer injuries that carved sizeable pieces out of his ice time over the years that followed. In 1994-95, he was only able eke out 33 games. He bounced back the following year but was again slowed from that point until the end of his career.

By 1997-98, Russell was usually only good for half a season of games. The Hawks finally gave up on him just after the start of the 1998 campaign. The hobbled rearguard joined the Colorado Avalanche for 35 games before his body finally gave out. He retired for good at that point.

As a junior blueliner with the Hull Olympiques of the QMJHL, big Cam Russell threw his weight around well, clearing creases, keeping opponents honest and showing a modest spark of offensive skill.

He was selected 50th overall in the 1987 Entry Draft by the Chicago Blackhawks. Upon completion of his four-year tour of junior duty in Hull, Russell jumped into the Hawks' stream with the Indianapolis Ice of the IHL. The move sparked the beginning of a three-year shuttle tour between Chicago and Indianapolis. It wasn't until the start of the 1992-93 season that the big rearguard finally caught on as a regular in the Windy City.

From then on, Russell established himself as a tough blueliner who concentrated on clearing his own zone and duking it out with uncooperative combatants. The price he paid for his physical play was to suffer injuries that carved sizeable pieces out of his ice time over the years that followed. In 1994-95, he was only able eke out 33 games. He bounced back the following year but was again slowed from that point until the end of his career.

By 1997-98, Russell was usually only good for half a season of games. The Hawks finally gave up on him just after the start of the 1998 campaign. The hobbled rearguard joined the Colorado Avalanche for 35 games before his body finally gave out. He retired for good at that point.

As a junior blueliner with the Hull Olympiques of the QMJHL, big Cam Russell threw his weight around well, clearing creases, keeping opponents honest and showing a modest spark of offensive skill.

He was selected 50th overall in the 1987 Entry Draft by the Chicago Blackhawks. Upon completion of his four-year tour of junior duty in Hull, Russell jumped into the Hawks' stream with the Indianapolis Ice of the IHL. The move sparked the beginning of a three-year shuttle tour between Chicago and Indianapolis. It wasn't until the start of the 1992-93 season that the big rearguard finally caught on as a regular in the Windy City.

From then on, Russell established himself as a tough blueliner who concentrated on clearing his own zone and duking it out with uncooperative combatants. The price he paid for his physical play was to suffer injuries that carved sizeable pieces out of his ice time over the years that followed. In 1994-95, he was only able eke out 33 games. He bounced back the following year but was again slowed from that point until the end of his career.

By 1997-98, Russell was usually only good for half a season of games. The Hawks finally gave up on him just after the start of the 1998 campaign. The hobbled rearguard joined the Colorado Avalanche for 35 games before his body finally gave out. He retired for good at that point.


REGULAR SEASON PLAYOFFS
Season Club League GP G A TP PIM +/- GP G A TP PIM
1984-85 Dartmouth Mounties NSAHA
1985-86 Hull Olympiques QMJHL 56 3 4 7 24 15 0 2 2 4
1985-86 Hull Olympiques M-Cup 5 0 0 0 7
1986-87 Hull Olympiques QMJHL 66 3 16 19 119 8 0 1 1 16
1987-88 Hull Olympiques QMJHL 53 9 18 27 141 19 2 5 7 39
1987-88 Hull Olympiques M-Cup 4 0 2 2 6
1988-89 Hull Olympiques QMJHL 66 8 32 40 109 9 2 6 8 6
1989-90 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 19 0 1 1 27 -3 1 0 0 0 0
1989-90 Indianapolis Ice IHL 46 3 15 18 114 9 0 1 1 24
1990-91 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 3 0 0 0 5 +1 1 0 0 0 0
1990-91 Indianapolis Ice IHL 53 5 9 14 125 6 0 2 2 30
1991-92 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 19 0 0 0 34 -8 12 0 2 2 2
1991-92 Indianapolis Ice IHL 41 4 9 13 78
1992-93 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 67 2 4 6 151 +5 4 0 0 0 0
1993-94 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 67 1 7 8 200 +10
1994-95 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 33 1 3 4 88 +4 16 0 3 3 8
1995-96 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 61 2 2 4 129 +8 6 0 0 0 2
1996-97 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 44 1 1 2 65 -8 4 0 0 0 4
1997-98 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 41 1 1 2 79 +3
1998-99 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 7 0 0 0 10 +1
1998-99 Colorado Avalanche NHL 35 1 2 3 84 -5
NHL Totals 396 9 21 30 872 44 0 5 5 16


Traded to Colorado by Chicago for Roman Vopat and Los Angeles' 6th round pick (previously acquired, later traded to Ottawa - Ottawa selected Martin Prusek) in 1999 NHL Draft, November 10, 1998.
Suffered career-ending torn rotator cuff injury in game vs. Philadelphia, February 14, 1999.
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